Tobacco Disparities

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [fid] => 841
            [uid] => 1
            [filename] => crowdsidewalk-2.jpg
            [uri] => public://crowdsidewalk-2.jpg
            [filemime] => image/jpeg
            [filesize] => 1265959
            [status] => 1
            [timestamp] => 1474927072
            [type] => image
            [field_file_image_alt_text] => Array
                (
                )

            [field_file_image_title_text] => Array
                (
                )

            [rdf_mapping] => Array
                (
                )

            [metadata] => Array
                (
                    [height] => 1333
                    [width] => 2000
                )

            [alt] => 
            [title] => 
            [height] => 1333
            [width] => 2000
        )

)
 -- http://nycsmokefree.org/sites/default/files/styles/crop/public/crowdsidewalk-2.jpg?itok=AdC4hZn6
Tobacco Disparities

The tobacco epidemic is far from over and significant disparities in tobacco use and secondhand smoke exposure persist for far too many New Yorkers, especially the most vulnerable. NYC Smoke-Free is committed to building health equity to put an end to the devastating tobacco epidemic.


Key Facts

  • Tobacco remains the #1 cause of premature, preventable death for New Yorkers and 1 out of every 3 smokers will die from smoking-related diseases
  • 25,000 New Yorkers - including 12,000 in NYC - continue to die every year from tobacco
  • 3,000 non-smoking New Yorkers die from secondhand smoke exposure each year
  • Studies have found disturbing tobacco disparities in Chinese American, LGBT, and immigrant populations, with smoking rates up to 3x higher than the general population

New York City has been a global leader in the fight against Big Tobacco and has made tremendous progress in preventing tobacco addiction and protecting our communities from dangerous secondhand smoke pollution. We have put in place evidence-based best practices in comprehensive tobacco control that are dramatically saving lives, increasing life expectancy, and improving the health of all New Yorkers.

However, even as overall smoking prevalence rates have trended downwards and are at historic lows, New Yorkers with limited income or education as well as those who struggle with mental health continue to have higher smoking rates. Studies have also found disturbing tobacco disparities in Chinese American, LGBT, and immigrant populations, with smoking rates up to three times higher than the general population.    

Now it's time to continue on NYC’s progress against tobacco and make additional investments in more comprehensive approaches that reach all New Yorkers. We must ensure tobacco disparities cease to continue with unmet needs for New Yorkers who are most vulnerable to tobacco addiction and the tobacco industry's aggressive marketing.    

 

Tags